Governance

The Defeating Malaria Board of Directors is a critical governance body appointed by the board Co-Chairs, Michelle A. Williams, Dean of the Faculty at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Mr Ray Nishimoto, Representative Director and Senior Managing Executive Officer and President of the Health and Crop Scientists Sector at Sumitomo Chemical Co., Ltd.

Members of the board are focused on helping to ensure the fulfillment of the goals of the Defeating Malaria Initiative. Comprised of distinguished individuals who share an awareness and deep concern for the incidence of malaria worldwide, a sense of urgency related to the need and potential to control and eradicate the disease, and a keen interest in the novel, multi-disciplinary approach of the Defeating Malaria Initiative and its approach to solving other critical global public health challenges.

Defeating Malaria Board       Advisors

Defeating Malaria Board, Co-Chair

image

Ray Nishimoto

Representative Director and Senior Managing Executive Officer, President of Health and Crop Scientists Sector, Sumitomo Chemical Co., Ltd. 

Ray Nishimoto

Representative Director and Senior Managing Executive Officer, President of Health and Crop Scientists Sector, Sumitomo Chemical Co., Ltd. 

Mr Ray Nishimoto is a member of the board of Sumitomo Chemical Co., Ltd., one of Japan’s leading chemical companies, and is responsible for the Global Crop Protection, Vector Control, and Pharmaceutical Chemicals businesses as well as all planning and coordination in the Health and Crop Sciences Sector. Mr Nishimoto joined Sumitomo Chemical in 1980. He became an executive officer in 2009, a managing executive officer in 2011, and a member of the board in 2013. He also served as executive vice president of Valent USA in California, one of Sumitomo Chemical’s affiliates in Crop Protection business.  

Mr Nishimoto’s mandate for Vector Control is to provide integrated technical solutions for disease prevention in a manner that maximizes lives saved, as part of Sumitomo Chemical’s commitment to Corporate Social Responsibility. Mr Nishimoto has also served as a member of the Strategic Council of Crop Protection, CropLife International, since 2010, and as the vice president of Japan Crop Protection Association since 2013. In September 2018, he was appointed Board Co-Chair of Defeating Malaria: From the Genes to the Globe Initiative at Harvard University. 

Defeating Malaria Board, Co-Chair

image

Michelle A. Williams

Dean of the Faculty, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Michelle A. Williams

Dean of the Faculty, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Dean Michelle A. Williams is an internationally renowned epidemiologist and public health scientist, an award-winning educator, and a widely recognized academic leader. Prior to becoming Dean of the Faculty at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in July 2016, she was professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology and program leader of Harvard’s Clinical and Translational Sciences Center (Harvard Catalyst) Population Health and Health Disparities Research Program.

Dean Williams joined the Harvard Chan faculty after a distinguished career at the University of Washington (UW) School of Public Health. While at UW, she served as co-director of the Center for Perinatal Studies at the Swedish Medical Center in Seattle, WA. She developed and directed the Reproductive Pediatric and Perinatal Training Program at the UW, held a joint appointment in Global Health from 2008–2011, and was an affiliate investigator at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center 1992–2010.

As an acclaimed researcher, Dean Williams’s scientific work places special emphasis in the areas of reproductive, perinatal, pediatric, and molecular epidemiology. She has extensive experience in carrying out large-scale, multidisciplinary research involving the collection and analysis of epidemiological data (e.g., sleep characteristics, physical activity, dietary intake, and environmental exposures) and biological specimens (e.g., blood based biochemistry/biomarkers, flow cytometry, genetic variants, whole genome expression of mRNA and miRNA), both domestically and internationally.

Dean Williams has published more than 425 peer-reviewed research papers ranging from studies of modifiable behavioral and environmental determinants of adverse health outcomes to genetic and genomic studies of common complications of pregnancy and chronic disorders among children and adults.

She has successfully administered large-scale, clinical epidemiology studies that seek to understand genetic and environmental causes of adverse pregnancy outcomes and other non-communicable disorders along the life course. Dean Williams also developed and directed (for more than seven years) the Reproductive Pediatric and Perinatal Training Program at the UW.

In 1994, Dean Williams developed, and is currently directing, the NIH-funded multidisciplinary international research training (MIRT) program that allows for the development and operations of undergraduate and graduate student training in global health, biostatistics, and epidemiology in over 14 foreign research sites in South America, South East Asia, Africa, and Europe. She was appointed Board Co-Chair of Defeating Malaria: From the Genes to the Globe Initiative at Harvard University in 2016.

Dean Williams has been recognized for her excellence in teaching, as the recipient of the Harvard Chan School’s Outstanding Mentor Award (2015), the White House’s Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring (2012), the UW’s Brotman Award for excellence in teaching (2007), and the American Public Health Association’s Abraham Lilienfeld Award for education in epidemiology (2007). She earned undergraduate degrees in Biology and Genetics from Princeton University in 1984. She earned a master’s degree in Civil Engineering from Tufts University, and master’s and doctoral degrees in Epidemiology from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Harvard University.

Defeating Malaria Board, Member

image

Ray Chambers

United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Health in Agenda 2030 and for Malaria

Ray Chambers

United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Health in Agenda 2030 and for Malaria

Mr Ray Chambers is a philanthropist and humanitarian who has directed most of his efforts towards helping children. He is the founding chairman of the Points of Light Foundation and co-founder, with Colin Powell, of America’s Promise–The Alliance for Youth. He also co-founded the National Mentoring Partnership and the Millennium Promise Alliance. Mr Chambers is the co-founder of Malaria No More, with Peter Chernin. He is also the founding chairman of the New Jersey Performing Arts Center and is the former chairman of Wesray Capital Corporation, which he co-founded with William E. Simon. In March 2013, Mr Chambers was appointed Special Envoy for Financing of the Health Related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), now the Special Envoy for Health in Agenda 2030 and for Malaria, by UN Secretary-General Ki-moon. He is the first person to hold the newly created position. He served as the founding Board Co-Chair of Harvard University’s Defeating Malaria: From the Genes to the Globe Initiative alongside Julio Frenk, former Dean of the Faculty at the Harvard Chan, from 2012–2018. Mr Chambers continues to serve on the Defeating Malaria Board as well as the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Communication Advisory Board.

Defeating Malaria Board, Member

image

J. Christopher Flowers

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, J.C. Flowers & Co. LLC.

J. Christopher Flowers

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, J.C. Flowers & Co. LLC.

Mr J. Christopher Flowers is chairman and chief executive officer of J.C. Flowers & Co. LLC, an investment company founded in 1998 and specializing in financial services. The J.C. Flowers & Co. Fund has assets under management of US $8 billion. Mr Flowers previously served as a partner in charge of the Financial Institutions Group at Goldman Sachs from 1979–1998. Mr Flowers was among the founders of Goldman’s Financial Institutions Group in 1986 and became a general partner of Goldman in 1988.

Among Mr Flower’s philanthropic engagements include serving as a trustee of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, launching and supporting NetsforLife, co-founding the Isdell:Flowers Cross Border Malaria Initiative in Africa, supporting the Harlem Parolee Initiative, and founding the JC Flowers Foundation. He graduated magna cum laude in Applied Mathematics from Harvard University in 1979.

Defeating Malaria Board, Member

image

James M. Jones

Executive Director, ExxonMobil Foundation

James M. Jones

Executive Director, ExxonMobil Foundation

Mr James M. Jones is executive director of the ExxonMobil Foundation. In this capacity, he oversees the ExxonMobil Foundation’s major grant-making programs in global health (specifically in the fight against malaria), women’s economic opportunities, and US math and science education. Previously,
he directed ExxonMobil’s global brand, advertising, and integrated communications work.

Prior to his work in the private sector, Mr Jones was the founding executive vice president at the Vaccine (now GAVI) Fund. He also was vice president of programs and policy at the Children’s Defense Fund where he oversaw the organization’s work on education, juvenile justice, child welfare, and health. For a dozen years, he served in various capacities in the US Congress, including director of communications and policy to then-Senator John F. Kerry, for whom he drafted global health legislation, including the original federal spending authorizations for many product development partnerships. Mr Jones is a graduate of Georgetown University and Oxford University; he was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to study international economics at the University of Munich.

Defeating Malaria Board, Member

image

Muhammad Pate

Chief Executive Officer, Big Win Philanthropy

Muhammad Ali Pate

Chief Executive Officer, Big Win Philanthropy

Dr Muhammad Ali Pate is chief executive officer of Big Win Philanthropy, a foundation that invests in maternal, child and reproductive health, nutrition and education, among other areas. Dr Pate is the former Minister of State for Health of the Federal Republic of Nigeria from 2011–2013 and also served as a member of the President’s Economic Management Team. During his tenure at the Minister of Health, he helped mobilize more than US$1 billion in additional financing for primary health care, chaired the Presidential Task Force on Polio Eradication in Nigeria, and developed innovative results-based initiatives, including a prevention program to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV and a clinical governance effort. Since June 2010, Dr Pate has co-chaired the Private Sector Health Alliance of Nigeria, which raised US$24 million domestically for investments to complement the Nigerian government’s Saving One Million Lives Initiative. Prior to his ministerial appointment, he served as chief executive of Nigeria’s National Primary Health Care Development Agency from 2008–2011, where he pioneered innovative strategies and interventions to address major primary health care issues in Nigeria. Dr Pate served as co-chair of the Harvard-London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine panel to review and advise the global health system on the lessons learned from the 2014 West African Ebola Outbreak. He is an adjunct professor of Global Health at Duke University and served as a 2016 Menschel Senior Leadership Fellow at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

During the course of his career, Dr Pate spent several years at the World Bank Group in Washington, DC, which included serving as senior health specialist and human development sector coordinator in the East Asia Pacific Region and also as a senior health specialist in the African Region. Dr Pate is a medical doctor with US Board Certifications in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases. He trained in sub-specialty of Infectious Diseases at the University of Rochester, NY. He earned a master’s degree in Business Administration with a health sector concentration from Duke University and a master’s degree in Health System Management from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. He earned a Medical degree from the Ahmadu Bello University, Nigeria in 1990. He has been honored with numerous global health awards, including the 2012 Harvard Health Leadership Award, and has authored or contributed to dozens of peer-reviewed publications and contributed book chapters.

Defeating Malaria Board, Member

image

Kenneth Staley

US Global Malaria Coordinator, US President’s Malaria Initiative

Kenneth Staley

US Global Malaria Coordinator, US President’s Malaria Initiative

Dr Kenneth Staley was appointed to lead the US President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI), the largest effort in history to control malaria in Africa and the Greater Mekong region in Asia, in April 2018. The PMI is a collaborative US government effort led by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) in conjunction with the US Department of Health and Human Services (namely, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), the US Department of State, the White House, among others. As coordinator, Dr Staley reports to the USAID administrator and has primary responsibility for the oversight and coordination of all resources and international activities of the US government relating to efforts to combat malaria.

Prior to his PMI appointment, Dr Staley was a consultant at McKinsey & Company, where he assisted with large public health crisis responses to Ebola and Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and also served clients in the pharmaceutical and medical device industries on strategic and operational topics. Prior to joining McKinsey, Dr Staley was an executive at Medtronic, where he led several new Medtronic ventures aimed at expanding access to medical technology in emerging economies. During the George W. Bush administration, Dr Staley served as deputy assistant secretary for Counterproliferation (Acting) in the US Department of State’s Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation. Prior to his work at the US Department of State, Dr Staley served as director for Biodefense Policy at the White House Homeland Security Council Biodefense Directorate, where he coordinated implementation of the National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza and development of policies related to biodefense preparedness and response activities for defense against intentional and naturally occurring biological threats.

Dr Staley earned a Medical degree from the University of Iowa’s Carver College of Medicine, from which he also received a distinguished alumni award for early career achievement. He earned a master’s degree in Public Administration from the Harvard Kennedy School and a bachelor’s degree in Biology from Washington University in Saint Louis.

Defeating Malaria Board, Member

image

Daniel H. Stern

Co-Founder and Co-Chief Executive Officer, Reservoir Capital Group

Daniel H. Stern

Co-Founder and Co-Chief Executive Officer, Reservoir Capital Group

Mr Daniel H. Stern is co-founder and co-chief executive officer of Reservoir Capital Group, a New York-based investment management firm. Prior to founding Reservoir Capital Group in 1998, Mr Stern co-founded and was president of Ziff Brothers Investments, a private investment advisory firm. Mr Stern has participated in the formation and development of numerous investment management entities, including Starwood Capital, Och-Ziff Capital Management, HBK Investments, Ellington Capital Management, and Anchorage Capital, among others. He previously worked with the Burden Family in New York and the Bass Family in Fort Worth, Texas.

Mr Stern is president of the Film Society of Lincoln Center. He is a trustee of the Mt. Sinai Medical Center, the Educational Broadcasting Corporation, and the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. He is a Board member of Harvard University’s Defeating Malaria: From the Genes to the Globe Initiative. Mr Stern earned a bachelor’s degree from Harvard College and a master’s of Business Administration from Harvard Business School.

Defeating Malaria Board, Member

image

Philip Welkhoff

Director, Malaria Program, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Philip Welkhoff

Director, Malaria Program, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Dr Philip Welkhoff is director of the Malaria Program at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Previously, he served as director of research at the Institute for Disease Modeling. There, he helped develop computer simulations of malaria, polio, and other disease transmission dynamics to assist public health professionals and other scientists in planning the eradication of different diseases.

Dr Welkhoff received a Special Achievement Award by a Hertz Fellow in 2009 for his work on malaria modeling. He earned dual undergraduate degrees in Mathematics and Aerospace Engineering from the University of Texas, Austin and earned a Doctor of Philosophy in Applied and Computational Mathematics from Princeton University. At Princeton, his work focused on biophysically-inspired models of neural circuits for perceptual decision making. He has served on the Board of the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation and he now serves as a senior interviewer. Prior to joining the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, he served as a pro bono external advisor to various programs, including Agriculture and Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene.

Defeating Malaria Board, Member

image

Dyann F. Wirth

Richard Pearson Strong Professor of Infectious Diseases, Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Dyann F. Wirth

Richard Pearson Strong Professor of Infectious Diseases, Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Professor Dyann F. Wirth has been a major leader in malaria research for more than 30 years. Recognizing the importance of bringing cutting-edge genomic science to the study of infectious diseases, she joined the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard shortly after its establishment to lead its infectious diseases initiative. Today, the Wirth laboratory blends the scientific environments of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, the Broad Institute, and research institutions from across the globe to create a unique malaria research and training network that brings together scientists with expertise in molecular biology, genetics, genomics, population genetics, chemistry, cell biology, epidemiology, computational biology, biostatistics, and leading clinicians in infectious diseases and pathology. Using a multidisciplinary approach, her group explores challenges related to mosquito biology and the malaria parasite.

Leveraging the genomic tools of the human genomic project, the group has applied state-of-the-art technologies and novel approaches to better understand the fundamental biology of the malaria parasite, evolution, and mechanisms of drug and insecticide resistance. This work has provided completely new insight into how the malaria parasite has evolved, specifically in the areas of population biology, drug resistance, and antigenicity. The group’s current efforts seek to determine both the number and identity of genes expressed by the parasite in response to drug treatment and to evaluate the role of these genes for parasite survival. This work aims to understand basic molecular mechanisms in protozoan parasites. Current findings have made significant contributions to advancing our understanding of malaria vaccine efficacy with long-term R&D goals to discover and apply preventive and therapeutic interventions against malaria infection. The group’s research activities are made possible through collaborative research partnerships with investigators, universities, and clinical centers in Africa, Asia, and the Americas.

In addition to her research and teaching efforts, Professor Wirth directs Harvard’s Defeating Malaria: From the Genes to the Globe Initiative, a university-wide effort to produce, transmit, and translate knowledge to support the control and eradication of malaria. Wirth is past chair of the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Harvard Chan (2006–2018). She is a member of the World Health Organization’s Malaria Policy Advisory Committee, fellow and past president of the American Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene (ASTMH), fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, and member of the National Academy of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. Professor Wirth is a recipient of the ASTMH’s Joseph Augustine LePrince Medal and honored with BioMalPar’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2018. She is a past board member of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund and the Marine Biological Laboratory.

Defeating Malaria Board, Member

image

Hiromasa Yonekura

Chairman Emeritus of Sumitomo Chemical, Chairman of KEIDANREN, Co-Chairman of the EU-Japan Business Round Table, and Chairman of the Japan-US Business Council

Hiromasa Yonekura

Chairman Emeritus of Sumitomo Chemical, Chairman of Sumitomo Chemical, Chairman of KEIDANREN, Co-Chairman of the EU-Japan Business Round Table, and Chairman of the Japan-US Business Council

Mr Hiromasa Yonekura joined Sumitomo Chemical Co., Ltd. in 1960. He became president of Sumitomo Chemical in 2000, and served as chairman of the company from 2009 –2014. Currently, he is also chairman of KEIDANREN, co-chairman of the EU-Japan Business Round Table, and chairman of the Japan-US Business Council.

Mr Yonekura earned a bachelor of Law degree from the University of Tokyo in 1960. He earned a master’s degree in 1964 and a Doctor of Philosophy in Economics from Duke University in 1965.

Advisor

Pedro L. Alonso

Director, Global Malaria Programme, World Health Organization

Dr Pedro L. Alonso is the director of the Global Malaria Programme at the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva, Switzerland. The Global Malaria Programme is responsible for the coordination of WHO’s global efforts to control and eliminate malaria and sets evidence-based norms, standards, policies, and guidelines to support malaria-affected countries around the world.

Dr Alonso has spent over 30 years in public health, having started his career as a physician working in West Africa. His past scientific research focused on the key determinants of morbidity and mortality in the most vulnerable population groups. He has published over 300 articles in international peer-revised journals, primarily on malaria treatment, vaccine trials, and preventive therapies, and he has served on several national and international committees. Dr Alonso is committed to the capacity building of both institutions and individuals, primarily in Africa.

Prior to taking on his current position at WHO, Dr Alonso served as director of the Barcelona Institute for Global Health, professor of Global Health at the University of Barcelona, and president of the governing board of the Manhiça Foundation and the Manhiça Health Research Center in Mozambique.

image

Pedro L. Alonso

Director, Global Malaria Programme, World Health Organization

Advisor

Regina Rabinovich

ExxonMobil Malaria Scholar in Residence, Harvard University
Director, Malaria Elimination Initiative and International Scholar, Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)

Since 2012, Dr Regina Rabinovich has served as the ExxonMobil Malaria Scholar in Residence at Harvard University. She is a global health leader with over 25 years’ experience in the research, public health, and philanthropic sectors, with focus on strategy, analytics, global health product development, and the introduction and scale-up of tools and strategies resulting in a positive impact on endemic populations.

Prior to joining Harvard University, she served as director of the Infectious Diseases Unit at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (2003–2012), overseeing the development and implementation of strategies for the prevention, treatment, and control of diseases of particular relevance to global health, including malaria, pneumonia, diarrhea, and neglected infectious diseases.

Dr Rabinovich has also served in various positions at the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), focusing on the development and evaluation of vaccines. She participated in the Children’s Vaccine Initiative, a global effort to prevent infectious diseases in children in the developing world, and served as liaison to the National Vaccine Program Office, focusing on vaccine safety and vaccine research. As chief of the Clinical and Regulatory Affairs Branch of the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, she managed the evaluation of candidate vaccines through a network of US clinical research units.

In 1999, Dr Rabinovich became director of the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative, a project funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to advance efforts to develop promising malaria vaccine candidates. She serves on the boards of several organizations focused on global health and infectious diseases, including the NIAID Council; the National Institutes of Health Council on Councils; PATH Vaccine Solutions; and AERAS. She is an advisor to the Board of Harvard University’s Defeating Malaria: From the Genes to the Globe Initiative and current president of the American Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene. Dr Rabinovich earned a Medical degree from Southern Illinois University and a master’s of Public Health from the University of North Carolina.

image

Regina Rabinovich

ExxonMobil Malaria Scholar in Residence, Harvard University