Governance

The Defeating Malaria Board is a critical governance body appointed by the Board Co-chairs, Michelle A. Williams, Dean of the Faculty at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Mr. Ray Chambers, United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Health in Agenda 2030 and for Malaria.

Members of the Board are focused on helping to ensure the fulfillment of the goals of the Defeating Malaria initiative. Comprised of distinguished individuals who share an awareness and deep concern for the incidence of malaria worldwide, a sense of urgency related to the need and potential to control and eradicate the disease, and a keen interest in the novel, multi-disciplinary approach of the Defeating Malaria initiative and its approach to solving other critical global public health challenges.

Defeating Malaria Board       Advisors

Defeating Malaria Board, Co-Chair

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Ray Chambers

United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Health in Agenda 2030 and for Malaria

Ray Chambers

United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Health in Agenda 2030 and for Malaria

Mr. Ray Chambers is a philanthropist and humanitarian who has directed most of his efforts towards helping children. He is the founding Chairman of the Points of Light Foundation and co-founder, with Colin Powell, of America’s Promise — The Alliance for Youth. He also co-founded the National Mentoring Partnership and the Millennium Promise Alliance. Mr. Chambers is the co-founder of Malaria No More, with Peter Chernin. He is also the Founding Chairman of the New Jersey Performing Arts Center and is the former Chairman of Wesray Capital Corporation, which he co-founded with William E. Simon. In March 2013, Mr. Chambers was appointed Special Envoy for Financing of the Health Related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), now the Special Envoy for Health in Agenda 2030 and for Malaria, by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon. He is the first person to hold the newly created position. At Harvard, Mr. Chambers is a member of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Communication Advisory Board, and Board co-chair of Harvard University’s Defeating Malaria: From the Genes to the Globe.

Defeating Malaria Board, Co-Chair

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Michelle A. Williams

Dean of the Faculty, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Michelle A. Williams

Dean of the Faculty, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Dean Michelle A. Williams is an internationally renowned epidemiologist and public health scientist, an award-winning educator, and a widely recognized academic leader. Prior to becoming Dean on July 1, 2016, she was Professor and Chair of the Department of Epidemiology at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Program Leader of Harvard’s Clinical and Translational Sciences Center (Harvard Catalyst) Population Health and Health Disparities Research Programs.

Dean Williams joined the Harvard Chan faculty after a distinguished career at the University of Washington (UW) School of Public Health where she rose through the faculty ranks to become a full professor of epidemiology in 2000. While at the UW, she was very active in the Center for Perinatal Studies at the Swedish Medical Center in Seattle, becoming co-director from 2000 to 2011, with broad responsibility for a multidisciplinary research program involving clinical investigators, basic scientists, and epidemiologists. From 1992 to 2010, she was an affiliate investigator at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, and from 2008 to 2011 she held a joint appointment in global health at the UW.

As an acclaimed researcher, Dean Williams’s scientific work places special emphasis in the areas of reproductive, perinatal, pediatric and molecular epidemiology. She has extensive experience in carrying out large-scale, multidisciplinary research involving the collection and analysis of epidemiological data (e.g., sleep characteristics, physical activity, dietary intake, and environmental exposures) and biological specimens (e.g., blood based biochemistry/biomarkers, flow cytometry, genetic variants, whole genome expression of mRNA and miRNA), both domestically and internationally.

Dean Williams has published more than 425 peer-reviewed research papers ranging from studies of modifiable behavioral and environmental determinants of adverse health outcomes to genetic and genomic studies of common complications of pregnancy and chronic disorders among children and adults.

She has successfully administered large-scale, clinical epidemiology studies that seek to understand genetic and environmental causes of adverse pregnancy outcomes and other non-communicable disorders along the life course. Dean Williams also developed and directed (for more than seven years) the Reproductive Pediatric and Perinatal Training Program at the UW.

In 1994, Dean Williams  developed, and is currently directing, the NIH-funded multidisciplinary international research training (MIRT) program that allows for the development and operations of undergraduate and graduate student training in global health, biostatistics and epidemiology in over 14 foreign research sites in South America, South East Asia, Africa, and Europe.

Dean Williams has been recognized for her excellence in teaching, as the recipient of the 2015 Harvard Chan School’s Outstanding Mentor Award, the UW’s Brotman Award for excellence in teaching (2007), the American Public Health Association’s Abraham Lilienfeld Award for education in epidemiology (2007), and the White House’s Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring (2012).

Dean Williams received her undergraduate degree in Biology and Genetics from Princeton University in 1984. She earned a master’s in Civil Engineering from Tufts University, and SM and ScD degrees in Epidemiology from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Harvard University.

Defeating Malaria Board, Member

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J. Christopher Flowers

Chairman & CEO
J.C. Flowers & Co. LLC.

J. Christopher Flowers

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, J.C. Flowers & Co. LLC.

J. Christopher Flowers is Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of J.C. Flowers & Co. LLC, an investment company founded in 1998 and specializing in financial services. The J.C. Flowers & Co. Fund has assets under management of US $8 billion. Mr. Flowers previously served as a partner in charge of the Financial Institutions Group at Goldman Sachs between 1979 and 1998. Mr. Flowers was among the founders of Goldman’s Financial Institutions Group in 1986 and became a general partner of Goldman in 1988. Among Mr. Flower’s philanthropic engagements include serving as a trustee of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, launching and supporting NetsforLife, co-founding the Isdell: Flowers Cross Border Malaria Initiative in Africa, and supporting the Harlem Parolee Initiative. He graduated magna cum laude in Applied Mathematics from Harvard University in 1979.

Defeating Malaria Board, Member

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Suzanne M. McCarron

Vice President of Public and Government Affairs, Exxon Mobil Corporation

Suzanne M. McCarron

Vice President, Public and Government Affairs, ExxonMobil Corporation

Suzanne M. McCarron is the Vice President of Public and Government Affairs for Exxon Mobil Corporation. She has worldwide responsibility for the Company’s activities in the areas of government relations, communications, media relations, global community relations, and corporate branding and advertising.  She also is Chairman of the ExxonMobil Foundation, the primary philanthropic arm of the Exxon Mobil Corporation in the United States. Previously, Ms. McCarron was the General Manager of Public and Government Affairs and President of the ExxonMobil Foundation. She joined the company in 1998.

A native of Prince Edward Island, Canada, Ms. McCarron earned a MAin Journalism from The University of Western Ontario and a BA in Public Affairs from Mount St. Vincent University in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Ms. McCarron serves as a member of the Defeating Malaria Board at Harvard University. She also is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Defeating Malaria Board, Member

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Muhammad Pate

Former Minister of State for Health of the Federal Republic of Nigeria (2011-2013)

Muhammad Ali Pate

Former Minister of State for Health of the Federal Republic of Nigeria (2011-2013)

Dr. Pate most recently served as Minister of State for Health of the Federal Republic of Nigeria from July 2011 to July 2013. He also served as member of the President’s Economic Management Team. During his tenure, he led the Presidential Task Force on Polio Eradication in Nigeria and developed an innovative results-based initiative to Save One Million Lives in Nigeria from preventable mortality by reviving the primary health care system.

Prior to his ministerial appointment, he served as the Chief Executive of Nigeria’s National Primary Health Care Development Agency (NPHCDA) from 2008-2011, in which capacity Dr. Pate pioneered innovative strategies and interventions to address major Primary Health Care issues in Nigeria. Dr. Pate is currently serving as a Visiting Professor at the Duke Global Health Institute.

During the course of his career, Dr. Pate spent several years at the World Bank Group in Washington, D.C., which included serving as the Senior Health Specialist and Human Development Sector Coordinator in the East Asia Pacific Region and also as a Senior Health Specialist in the African Region.

Dr. Pate is an American Board Certified MD in Internal Medicine. He trained in sub-specialty of Infectious Diseases at the University of Rochester, NY, holds an MBA from Duke University and a masters in Health System Management from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine UK. He graduated with a MD from the Ahmadu Bello University, Nigeria in 1990.

Defeating Malaria Board, Member

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Daniel H. Stern

Founder and Co-CEO, Reservoir Capital Group

Daniel H. Stern

Founder and Co-CEO, Reservoir Capital Group

Prior to founding the Reservoir Capital Group in 1998, a New York-based investment management firm, Mr. Stern was President of Ziff Brothers Investments, a private investment advisory firm, and previously worked with the Burden Family in New York and the Bass Family in Fort Worth, Texas.

Mr. Stern has participated in the formation and development of numerous investment management entities, including Starwood Capital, Och-Ziff Capital Management, HBK Investments, Ellington Capital Management, and Anchorage Capital, among others.

Mr. Stern is President of the Film Society of Lincoln Center.  He is a trustee of the Mt. Sinai Medical Center, the Educational Broadcasting Corporation (PBS Channel 13), and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. He is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Business School.

Defeating Malaria Board, Member

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Henri A. Termeer

Retired Chairman, President, and CEO of Genzyme Corporation

Henri A. Termeer

Retired Chairman, President, and CEO of Genzyme Corporation

Mr. Termeer served as chairman, president and chief executive officer of Genzyme Corporation for nearly three decades. He was appointed president of Genzyme in 1983, two years after the company’s founding. Mr. Termeer became its chief executive officer in 1985 and chairman in 1988. He retired from Genzyme in June 2011 following the acquisition of Genzyme by Sanofi in a transaction valued at more than $20 billion.

Widely acknowledged for his contributions to the biotechnology industry and health care field, Mr. Termeer is active in the areas of humanitarian assistance, policy issues, and innovation in providing access to health care.

Mr. Termeer is a Board member of Massachusetts Institute of Technology Corporation and serves on its Executive Committee, a director of Massachusetts General Hospital, Board member of Partners HealthCare, a member of the Board of Fellows of Harvard Medical School and on the Board of the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO). He also serves on the Boards of Abiomed, Inc., AVEO Pharmaceuticals, Verastem, Inc. and Medical Simulation Corporation. In 2008, he was appointed to Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick’s Council of Economic Advisors and he is a co-chair of the Leadership Council of the Massachusetts Life Sciences Collaborative. Mr. Termeer is also Chairman Emeritus of the New England Healthcare Institute, a nonprofit, applied research health policy organization he was instrumental in founding. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1999.

Mr. Termeer was Chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s Board of Directors from 2010-2011 and served on the Board of Directors of the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America. Mr. Termeer studied Economics at the Economische Hogeschool (Erasmus University, The Netherlands) and earned an MBA from the Darden School at the University of Virginia. Mr. Termeer has been recognized by several highly regarded organizations for his contributions to the healthcare and entrepreneurial field.

Defeating Malaria Board, Member

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Hiromasa Yonekura

Chairman Emeritus of Sumitomo Chemical, Chairman of KEIDANREN, Co-Chairman of the EU-Japan Business Round Table, and Chairman of the Japan-U.S. Business Council

Hiromasa Yonekura

Chairman Emeritus of Sumitomo Chemical, Chairman of Sumitomo Chemical, Chairman of KEIDANREN, Co-Chairman of the EU-Japan Business Round Table, and Chairman of the Japan-U.S. Business Council

Mr. Yonekura joined Sumitomo Chemical Co., Ltd. in 1960. He became President of Sumitomo Chemical in 2000, and served as Chairman of the company from 2009 to 2014. Currently, he is also Chairman of KEIDANREN, Co-Chairman of the EU-Japan Business Round Table, and Chairman of the Japan-U.S. Business Council.

Mr. Yonekura graduated from the University of Tokyo with a LLB in 1960.  He earned his MA from the Department of Economics, Graduate School, Duke University in 1964 and completed the PhD course of the same school in 1965.

Defeating Malaria Board, Member

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Dyann Wirth

Richard Pearson Strong Professor of Infectious Diseases, Chair, Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Dyann Wirth

Richard Pearson Strong Professor of Infectious Diseases, Chair, Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Professor Dyann Wirth has been a major leader in the area of malaria research. Her work has provided completely new insight into how the malaria parasite has evolved, specifically in the areas of population biology, drug resistance, and antigenicity. The Wirth laboratory blends the scientific environments of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, the Broad Institute, and collaborators from around the globe to create a unique malaria research and training network that brings together scientists with expertise in molecular biology, genetics, genomics, population genetics, chemistry, cell biology, epidemiology, computational biology, biostatistics, and leading clinicians in infectious diseases and pathology.

Using this approach, the Wirth group is working to understand the mechanisms of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum, the major human malaria parasite. Leveraging the genomic tools of the human genomic project, the group has applied state of the art technologies and novel approaches to better understand the fundamental biology of the malaria parasite and mechanisms of drug resistance. The group’s current efforts seek to determine both the number and identity of genes expressed by the parasite in response to drug treatment and to evaluate the role of these genes for parasite survival. The long-term goal of this work is to understand basic molecular mechanisms in protozoan parasites with the goal of discovering and applying preventive and therapeutic interventions against infection. Professor Wirth’s research activities are made possible through collaborative research partnerships with investigators, universities, and clinical centers in Africa, Asia, and South America.

Together with partners in the malaria community, Professor Wirth is involved in a university-wide effort to produce, transmit, and translate knowledge to support the control and ultimate eradication of malaria. This initiative is spearheaded by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in collaboration with the Harvard Global Health Institute, and was launched in partnership with the United Nations Special Envoy for Financing the Health Millennium Development Goals and Malaria. This university-wide initiative is called Defeating Malaria: From the Genes to the Globe.

Professor Wirth is Past President of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene; a member of the Board of Directors of the Burroughs-Wellcome Fund and the Board of the Marine Biological Laboratory; a member of The Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology.

Defeating Malaria Board, Member

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Tim Ziemer

United States Navy (Retired), U.S. Global Malaria Coordinator, President’s Malaria Initiative, USAID

Tim Ziemer

United States Navy (Retired), U.S. Global Malaria Coordinator, President’s Malaria Initiative, USAID

Rear Admiral Tim Ziemer leads the President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI), a historic U.S. Government initiative to reduce the burden of malaria and help relieve poverty in Africa. Appointed in June 2006, Rear Admiral Ziemer has served as the U.S. Global Malaria Coordinator for the past eight years, leading the Initiative across two Administrations. He has been recognized as “one of the most quietly effective leaders in public health.” As Coordinator, Rear Admiral Ziemer reports to the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Administrator and has direct authority over both PMI and USAID malaria programs.

PMI is an interagency initiative led by USAID and implemented together with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). It is overseen by the U.S. Global Malaria Coordinator and an Interagency Advisory Group made up of representatives of USAID, CDC/HHS, the Department of State, the Department of Defense, the National Security Council, and the Office of Management and Budget. In 2008, the Lantos-Hyde Act authorized the expansion of PMI, and, in 2009, it was included as a key component of the U.S. Government’s Global Health Initiative; it contributes significantly to the goal of ending preventable child and maternal deaths. Since its launch, PMI has contributed to the important reductions in malaria mortality that have been recorded among children under five in Africa.

Born in Sioux City, Iowa, Rear Admiral Ziemer was raised in Asia, the son of missionary parents serving in Vietnam. After graduating from Wheaton College, he joined the Navy, completed flight school, and returned to Vietnam during the war. During his naval career, Rear Admiral Ziemer commanded several squadrons, naval stations, and an air wing supporting the first Gulf War. Subsequent assignments included serving as the senior fellow with the Navy’s Strategic Studies Program at the Naval War College, and Deputy Director for Operations in the National Military Operations Center on the Joint Command Staff.

Prior to his appointment as U.S. Global Malaria Coordinator, Rear Admiral Ziemer was Vice President of the Arlington Institute, a nonprofit research institute specialized in strategic planning, and Executive Director of World Relief, a humanitarian organization.

Advisor

Rajesh Garg

Director, McKinsey & Company

Dr. Garg is a director at the global consulting firm McKinsey & Company, where he is a consultant to various segments of the healthcare industry and has worked on malaria-related issues for the past five years. Prior to joining McKinsey in 1992, he practiced law and medicine in California. Dr. Garg earned an MD from Stanford Medical School, a JD from Yale Law School, and a BA in Genetics and Sociology from the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Garg is a Board Member of NYCCHP, an organization dedicated to homeless children in New York City and is an advisor to Harvard University’s Defeating Malaria Board.

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Rajesh Garg

Director, McKinsey & Company

Advisor

Gabriel Jaramillo

Former General Manager, Global Fund

Mr. Jaramillo has 33 years of experience in the financial sector, particularly in Latin America. Mr. Jaramillo joined Grupo Santander in 1996 as a Managing Director. At that time, he worked on bank acquisitions in several countries in Latin America. From 1997 to 1999, he served as President of Banco Santander Colombia. From September to March 2008, he was president of Banco Santander (Brazil). He serves as a member of the Board of Director of Banco Santander (Brazil). Through various acquisitions and organic growth built a franchise where Santander became the second largest private financial intuition in Brazil. In 2008, he became an advisor to the Chairman of Grupo Santander.

Before joining Santander, he established a solid career in Citibank (1975-1979 and 1983-1994) and Colombia (1990-1991) operations. Prior to this, he held several important positions based in Miami, Colombia, and Mexico having, at different times, the responsibility for commercial activities in various countries. He also headed the Marine Midland Bank – HSBC Chilean operations based in Chile from 1979 to 1983.

Mr. Gabriel Jaramillo served as the President and Chief Executive Officer of Santander Holdings USA, Inc. (Sovereign Bancorp Inc.) from 2009 through 2011, when Jorge Morán was named Chief Executive of Sovereign Bank and Country Head of Santander businesses in the United States.  Gabriel Jaramillo continues as non-executive Chairman of the Board of Directors of Sovereign and Santander Holdings USA, Inc.

In 2011, he joined the United Nations Office of the Special Envoy for Malaria, with the objective to eliminate malaria deaths by 2015. In this role, he served as a Special Advisor to Mr. Ray Chambers, UN Special Envoy for Malaria and was a Member of the High-Level, Independent Panel that looked at the Global Fund’s fiduciary controls and oversight mechanisms. In 2012, he accepted a 12-month appointment as General Manager of the Global Fund. During his time at the Global Fund, he made significant changes to strengthen grant management, improve efficiency and tighten financial supervision. In Spring 2014, Mr. Jaramillo was a Menschel Senior Leadership Fellow at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Mr. Jaramillo serves as an advisor to Harvard University’s Defeating Malaria Board. Mr. Jaramillo was born in Bogota, Colombia. He obtained a BA in Marketing and an MBA at California State University.

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Gabriel Jaramillo

Former General Manager, Global Fund

Advisor

Tetsuyuki Maruyama

Corporate Officer, General Manager & Head of Pharmaceutical Research, Takeda Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd.

Dr. Tetsuyuki Maruyama is currently Corporate Officer, General Manager and Head of the Pharmaceutical Research Division at Takeda Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd. Trained as a neuroscientist, Tetsuyuki began his career in academics at the University of Minnesota in the US, then later at Cardiff University in the UK, where he was Professor of Neurobiology in the Cardiff School of Biosciences. In 2003, he took his interest in the mechanisms of learning, memory and disorders of cognition into industry, moving to Merck Sharp and Dohme’s Neuroscience Research Centre in the UK. In 2005, Tetsuyuki took the opportunity to move to Singapore as Head of GlaxoSmithKline’s new Centre for Research in Cognitive and Neurodegenerative Disorders, where he stayed until 2010 before moving to Takeda. Now working from Takeda’s new state of the art global research hub the Shonan Research Center near Tokyo, he is responsible for ensuring that Takeda’s global drug discovery teams produce valuable new medicines for unmet medical needs in Takeda’s key therapeutic areas, including CNS, metabolic, cardiovascular, inflammation & immunology, GI & GU, vaccines and cancer (in partnership with Millennium, the Takeda Oncology Company). In 2012, Tetsuyuki became a Japan National and changed his name (previously Paul Chapman).

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Tetsuyuki Maruyama

Corporate Officer, General Manager & Head of Pharmaceutical Research, Takeda Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd.

Advisor

Regina Rabinovich

ExxonMobil Malaria Scholar in Residence, Harvard University
Director, Malaria Elimination Initiative and International Scholar, Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)

Since 2012, N. Regina Rabinovich has served as the ExxonMobil Malaria Scholar in Residence at Harvard University. She is a global health leader with over 25 years’ experience in the research, public health, and philanthropic sectors, with focus on strategy, analytics, global health product development, and the introduction and scale-up of tools and strategies resulting in impact on endemic populations.

Prior to joining Harvard University, she served as the Director of the Infectious Diseases Unit at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (2003-2012), overseeing the development and implementation of strategies for the prevention, treatment, and control of diseases of particular relevance to global health, including malaria, pneumonia, diarrhea, and neglected infectious diseases.

Dr. Rabinovich has also served in various positions at the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), focusing on the development and evaluation of vaccines. She participated in the Children’s Vaccine Initiative, a global effort to prevent infectious diseases in children in the developing world, and served as liaison to the National Vaccine Program Office, focusing on vaccine safety and vaccine research. As chief of the Clinical and Regulatory Affairs Branch of the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, she managed the evaluation of candidate vaccines through a network of U.S. clinical research units.

In 1999, Rabinovich became director of the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative, a project funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to advance efforts to develop promising malaria vaccine candidates. She serves on the boards of several organizations focused on global health and infectious diseases, including the NIAID Council and the NIH Council on Councils; PATH Vaccine Solutions; and AERAS. She is an advisor to Harvard University’s Defeating Malaria Board.

Dr. Rabinovich earned a MD from Southern Illinois University and a MPH degree from the University of North Carolina.

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Regina Rabinovich

ExxonMobil Malaria Scholar in Residence, Harvard University